changing the rear rotor?

cook.675

Member
I was foolish and didn't check my rear pads in a long time and they grinded down to nothing and I scoured the rotor pretty bad. On top of that its out of spec for thickness

I can't find alot of info on the forum or alot of detail in the service manual about replacing the rear rotor;

I guess I'm just curious how involved is this project and if there's other things I should replace or look at if I take the wheel off?
 

Motogiro

Vrrroooooom!
Super Moderator
Moderator
Elite Member
This is the 06 which should be the same as your S1


Just to be safe I would buy the 5 bolts. Use an impact to get them off. Even a manual hammer driven impact would be better than just an allen wrench. Use a torque wrench to specification on the reinstallation.
 

TownsendsFJR1300

2007 FZ6
Site Supporter
To add, use a hand, impact driver tool to remove the bolts. They will very likely be loctited in and VERY TIGHT...

I would also take a heat gun to the wheel where each bolt goes thru which will help loosen any loctite. It doesn't need to red hot, not burn the paint off but very warm...

And definitly use new bolts with a thread locker...






"LT" is loctite..

 
Last edited:

Gary in NJ

Junior Member
Site Supporter
...do we want to discuss dry torque values versus wet torque values....

Probably not for 22 ft-lbs

...I cant help myself....

When using wet thread locker (or never-seize), reduce the torque value by 10%.
 

TownsendsFJR1300

2007 FZ6
Site Supporter
...do we want to discuss dry torque values versus wet torque values....

Probably not for 22 ft-lbs

...I cant help myself....

When using wet thread locker (or never-seize), reduce the torque value by 10%.
Per the Yamaha manual, your using thread locker which of course goes on clean/dry threads.

I prefer the stronger RED and if replacing the rotor (as the OP is), would use red and go to 22lbs/ft. A fair amount of heat WILL break the grip of the "red" if need be..
 

Gary in NJ

Junior Member
Site Supporter
I think that OEM rotor bolts come with dry thread lock, therefor the dry value is correct. If adding your own TL and torqing it wet, reduce the value. Or alternatively you could add the TL and wait for it to dry. I'm way too impatient to do that.
 

TownsendsFJR1300

2007 FZ6
Site Supporter
I think that OEM rotor bolts come with dry thread lock, therefor the dry value is correct. If adding your own TL and torqing it wet, reduce the value. Or alternatively you could add the TL and wait for it to dry. I'm way too impatient to do that.

The bolts very likely do come with threadlock (never replaced mine but it makes sense) so simply install, tighten and assemble, then ride..

BTW, I used the RED locker on a Stihl BR 600 commercial backpack blower on the cam shaft gear which does NOT have any key way or alignment methods short of eye balling and pressing on. The gear was so loose, I could manually rotate it on the crank. With the RED loctite, I positioned it, pushed it on and it sat maybe 6 hours (as I re-assembled). With nothing else holding that cam gear, it never moved-GREAT STUFF.. (Exhaust valve re-tainer broke loose at WOT and bent the exhaust valve. Replaced main crank bearings as shown)








The machine re-assembled (click to see run):
https://flic.kr/p/24YBpdn
 

Gary in NJ

Junior Member
Site Supporter
In the DRZ community the countershaft sprocket is known to come loose and cause a lot of damage to the shaft. The fix is to use red locktite on the shaft spline before inserting the sprocket on the spline, and then installing the nut. Yeah, that stuff works.
 

FinalImpact

2 Da Street, Knobs R Gone
Super Moderator
Site Supporter
OP, if the Allen driver begins to slip or is rounded slightly you can grind it flat. Just don't get it hot.

Also, if the bolts edges flair up a bit, use a small round flat tip punch and beat them down flat. The shock will also help loosen the bolts while semi-restoring the allen cap shape.
 
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