Mounting Custom Turn Signals, Easy Solution

Ruggybuggy

Member
When I first went to mount my LED turn signals I soon discovered that after removing the stock signals it left large tear drop holes and no way to mount the custom signals. I posted my problem and was told I need new mounting brackets. I came up with a solution using the existing parts from the stock signals.

Here are the stock parts to be used.



Cut the end off the stock turn signal so it looks like the one in the picture. I cut just above were the rubber bulges then used my bench grinder to smooth it out. Modify the plastic piece by removing the two plastic tabs so they are flush as shown in the photo. Sorry for the blurry pic.



The two pieces will fit together as shown.



Remove the two rubber tabs so it looks like this.



This what is looks like installed.



Thead the plastic part onto your turn signal.



Install onto the bike.



Use a large stainless steel washer along with your existing mounting nut.



Secure in place



The final result. This works on the front as well.



 

Ruggybuggy

Member
I thought maybe this could be a sticky. :thumbup:
I did a ton of searching for a solution to mount in the stock location and found none.
 

Gelvatron

Junior Member
Elite Member
You can do the same for the front I bought some plastic pieces shaped like ovals with a precut whole at cycle gear for 5 bucks for a pack of 4 sandwiched the old hole in the stock drop down bracket took 5 mins
 

slowroller

New Member
I put a set of "speedmetal" turn signals on the rear. Nothing there bat a mounting bracket and two mini-signals. The License plate provides most of the support. It was a snap to wire and I saved a little more then 3 pounds! That plastic turd hanging out the rear is heavy. 19.99$
I'm here on this forum because i didn't get so lucky with the front. My bike goes down so often I put a tramp stamp on her. The brake side stalk broke off the ABS collar in the cowl. I tried to plastic weld it back together and really boitched it. I though I had it right but it hadn't set. So went to get a bite and ended up doing something. When I got back, the turn signal had slipped and rotated so it was pointing at the ground. And it was all the way set, as hard as a rock of course. So I found a set of flush mounts that were large enough to cover the hole in the cowl and were 3 wire so I could keep my running lights and flashers. Only then I messed up the wiring and blew a fuze (I hope). The fuse box IS NOT where Yamaha claims it is. I fear It buried back under the gas tank.
 

Motogiro

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Right side of bike. Plastic pod near rear of seat. ..:)

Sent from Moto's Motorola
 

slowroller

New Member
I found it. Your right. my right, that other fellas right. I found a write up at SBN that said "throttle side". That did it for me. Front back, standing on my head, sitting on the porch, what ever. The throttle side stays the same no mater what the POV is.
Replaced the fuze and the blinkers work as well as they ever did. The throttle side has a faster blink then the chainside. The service manual say check the flasher. Not sure if I'm gonna mess with it. I hate taking the cowl on and off. I only use them when the cops are looking at me. I still have to seal the gap between the new assembly and the cowl. I've ordered some plastic epoxy that shapes and sands real well. I still got some color rite paint left from painting my hugger that matches the cowl. So I will build a collar to fill the gap between the curve of the cowl and the blinker. I'll ride it for a while to see if everything is working before I finish it off.
 

slowroller

New Member
You can do the same for the front I bought some plastic pieces shaped like ovals with a precut whole at cycle gear for 5 bucks for a pack of 4 sandwiched the old hole in the stock drop down bracket took 5 mins
I didn't think of going to Cycle Gear. I cut a rubber gasket to go against the cowl. Then I cut up a foam pool toy to get filling. It is one of those tubs the kids play with in a pool. It cuts easy and is pretty stiff. It was free and there was enough of it so I could scew it up many times before I got it right. The only problem is it's pink. The gasket is red. What is good about it is it collapses as I tighten down the screws on the new signal. So any minor mistake in the angle of the cut doesn't matter. I will use the foam as backing and filler for a coat of modelers epoxy. Then sand and paint. As long as I don't have to take anything apart in the future it should work out. I don't think I'm all that picky about how my bike looks but I can't deal with the red and pink on blue.
 

Motogiro

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I found it. Your right. my right, that other fellas right. I found a write up at SBN that said "throttle side". That did it for me. Front back, standing on my head, sitting on the porch, what ever. The throttle side stays the same no mater what the POV is.
Replaced the fuze and the blinkers work as well as they ever did. The throttle side has a faster blink then the chainside. The service manual say check the flasher. Not sure if I'm gonna mess with it. I hate taking the cowl on and off. I only use them when the cops are looking at me. I still have to seal the gap between the new assembly and the cowl. I've ordered some plastic epoxy that shapes and sands real well. I still got some color rite paint left from painting my hugger that matches the cowl. So I will build a collar to fill the gap between the curve of the cowl and the blinker. I'll ride it for a while to see if everything is working before I finish it off.
Main thing is you found the fuse. Right side of a vehicle is always the way the rider/driver sits facing forward in/on the vehicle. You can replace your flasher with an electronic flasher and the left and right side will flash at the same rate. Your right and left side loads vary and this is why you have different flash rates. Swapping the flasher to an electronic type eliminates the need for balanced loading(within reason) and also the need that some people have to use inefficient load resistors.
It's not a bad idea to use your directional indicators to let people know your intent when you're in traffic and not just because of the PoPo.. :)
 

slowroller

New Member
I disagree. I rode Courier in Washington D.C. from '72 to '83. 1,000 miles a week was the minimum. Boss charged by the mile and if you couldn't do 1,000 miles in 40 to 60 hours he would find someone that could. My average was a little over 2200 per week. So I have lots of experience riding in traffic. 2% of the Human race are stone cold killers. Murder of a motorcycle rider by a psycho in a car is easy and commonplace. How can the Police prove it?
Since there is no way to tell which 2 of the next 100 cars you see has the killer behind the wheel, the safe thing is treating them all as if they are out to kill you and not giving them the chance. My favorite thing about the FZ-6 is how nimble it is in traffic. I've got the weight down to around 425 wet and she handles like the rowdy vixen she is. I NEVER pass on the right or pull out in front of a vehicle. I expect to last a lot longer then any of the MSF fools in their meter maid jackets.
 

Motogiro

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I disagree. I rode Courier in Washington D.C. from '72 to '83. 1,000 miles a week was the minimum. Boss charged by the mile and if you couldn't do 1,000 miles in 40 to 60 hours he would find someone that could. My average was a little over 2200 per week. So I have lots of experience riding in traffic. 2% of the Human race are stone cold killers. Murder of a motorcycle rider by a psycho in a car is easy and commonplace. How can the Police prove it?
Since there is no way to tell which 2 of the next 100 cars you see has the killer behind the wheel, the safe thing is treating them all as if they are out to kill you and not giving them the chance. My favorite thing about the FZ-6 is how nimble it is in traffic. I've got the weight down to around 425 wet and she handles like the rowdy vixen she is. I NEVER pass on the right or pull out in front of a vehicle. I expect to last a lot longer then any of the MSF fools in their meter maid jackets.
I don't doubt your statistics are pretty accurate and so I will say there are probably close to 88% out of those 100 drivers that are not out to hurt you on purpose but may just be idiots and a signal doesn't mean anything other that you are a good rider or bad rider to them. It's got nothing to do with meter maids but if you need to throw them around for creativity, why not? I've known a few MSF instructors that I totally respect. For the work they do to help new riders and for their riding skills. I would also say I believe I'm a seasoned experienced rider and a good judge of riders and how their attitude effects incidents on motorcycles. Our experience as riders can also be much varied in regard to city, state and/or terrain. My directional signals have never detracted from my skill as a rider.:) I've been stopped a few times by CHP and never gotten a ticket for non operational equipment on my bike. Uh yeah ..... other stuff ..... Stay safe out there! :)
 

TownsendsFJR1300

2007 FZ6
Site Supporter
You may not have noticed Cliff but slowroller rode in Washington DC which is a different planet altogether...


That idiot in Texas (last week) that changed lanes to stop a bike from passing shows the stupidity out there.

I agree thou, ANYTHING that makes me more visible/noticable, whether it's directionals, loud pipes, Hyper lights etc, the better..



Ride like your invisible!
 
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